Allo' Expat Curacao - Connecting Expats in Curacao
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Curacao Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter
 
Check our Rates
   Information Center Curacao
Curacao General Information
 
History of Curacao
Curacao Culture
Curacao Cuisine
Curacao Geography
Curacao Population
Curacao Government
Curacao Economy
Curacao Communications
Curacao Transportations
Curacao Military
Curacao Transnational Issues
Curacao Healthcare
Curacao People, Language & Religion
Curacao Expatriates Handbook
Curacao and Foreign Government
Curacao General Listings
Curacao Useful Tips
Curacao Education & Medical
Curacao Travel & Tourism Info
Curacao Lifestyle & Leisure
Curacao Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

Curacao Government
 
 
 

General

Curaçao gained self-government on 1 January 1954 as an island territory of the Netherlands Antilles. Despite this, the islanders did not fully participate in the political process until after the social movements of the late '60s. In the 2000s the political status of the island has been under discussion again, as for the other islands of the Netherlands Antilles, regarding the relationship with the Netherlands and between the islands of the Antilles.

In a referendum held on 8 April 2005, the residents voted for a separate status outside the Netherlands Antilles, like Aruba, rejecting the options for full independence, becoming part of the Netherlands, or retaining the status quo. In 2006, Emily de Jongh-Elhage, a resident of Curaçao, was elected as the new prime minister of the Netherlands Antilles, and not Curaçao.

On 1 July 2007, the island of Curaçao was due to become a country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. On 28 November 2006, the island council rejected a clarificatory memorandum on the process. On 9 July 2007 the new island council of Curaçao approved the agreement previously rejected in November 2006. On 15 December 2008, Curaçao was scheduled to become a separate country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands (like Aruba and the Netherlands Antilles are now). A non-binding referendum on this plan took place in Curaçao on 15 May 2009, in which 52% of the voters supported these plans.

Dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles was effected on 10 October 2010. Curaçao is now a country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, with the Kingdom retaining responsibility for defence and foreign policy. The Kingdom will also oversee the island's finances under a debt-relief arrangement agreed on between the two.

Executive power rests with a governor, and a prime minister heads a Cabinet. The governor of Curaçao is appointed for a six-year term by the monarch, and the prime minister and deputy prime minister are elected by the Staten for four-year terms.

Legislative power is shared by the government and the legislature. The legislature or Staten is made up of 21 members elected by direct, popular vote to serve four-year terms.

Curaçao's judicial system, which has mainly been derived from the Dutch system, operates independently of the legislature and the executive. Jurisdiction, including appeal, lies with the Common Court of Justice of Aruba and the Netherlands Antilles and the Supreme Court of Justice in the Netherlands.

Overview

Country name :
Dutch long form: Land Curaçao
Dutch short form: Curaçao
Papiamentu long form: Pais Korsou
Papiamentu short form: Korsou
former: Netherlands Antilles; Curaçao and Dependencies

Dependency status :
constituent country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands; full autonomy in internal affairs granted in 2010; Dutch Government responsible for defence and foreign affairs


See more information on the next page... (next)

 

 
 
   



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2018 | Policy